29LT Azal : A Free Geometric Display Font

29LT Azal is a sturdy geometric font with contemporary Arabic features that are inspired from the old Eastern Kufic manuscripts and drawn in a modern-day approach, and old is, after all, what Azal means in Arabic. It is a display font with prominent and sturdy design characteristics. Each letter structure is designed to create a balance between solid base forms and elegant terminals. The font structure is a mixture of: high contrast between thick and thin pen strokes, diagonal skeleton, small counters, thick baseline and sharp edges contrasted by circular dots.

29LT-Azal-Header-Image-02

Continue reading “29LT Azal : A Free Geometric Display Font”

UA Neo Fonts

Ha' Glyph in both UA Neo N & B
Ha’ Glyph in both UA Neo N & B

UA Neo B, originally known as UA Beiruti Modern, and UA Neo N, originally known as UA Neo-Nashki, belong to the first set of type revivals of Unified Arabic first introduced by Nasri Khattar in the 1950s. They belong to the Unified Arabic™ type system that contains a library of eight typefaces, including both print (detached) and cursive (connected) styles. After over 60 years, Mr. Khattar’s daughter, Camille, has entrusted 29Letters with the revival of her father’s fonts to keep them in line with his vision and design approach. Continue reading “UA Neo Fonts”

Introductory Arabic Type Course at AUB

This spring, the elective course “Introduction to Arabic Type Design” at AUB [American University of Beirut] was introduced. It is given part of the Graphic Design program at AUB. Third and fourth year students who were interested in Arabic type and wanted to develop their skills in understanding and drawing Arabic letters, enrolled in the course. The course was an ongoing collaboration between the students and I. I had to evaluate what they could and needed to learn as opposed to what was too advanced for them.

Continue reading “Introductory Arabic Type Course at AUB”

Censored. Why now? Graffiti in Beirut post Arab revolutions.

Since the publication of the Arabic Graffiti Book in 2011, which I co-edited with Don Karl, the scene and stance of graffiti in Beirut has changed drastically. With the development of the Arab Spring across the neighboring Arab nations such as in Syria and Egypt, Beirut has experienced a new Arab graffiti scene and a new censorship aspect that was not present in the previous years. Alongside Lebanese socio-political stencils and murals, Beirut is being bombarded with Syrian, Egyptian and as usual Palestinian political and revolutionary writings.


عذرا إن أزعجنا أحد، إننا في سوريا، نبني وطن
Sorry for disturbing anyone, We are in Syria, Building a Nation

Continue reading “Censored. Why now? Graffiti in Beirut post Arab revolutions.”

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑